Lots of experienced woodworkers name the router as one of most versatile power tools. Workers using a router can shape decorative edges, form raised panels, cut grooves and slots, carve signs, make moldings, rout intricate inlays, trim plastic laminate and veneers, and mill dozens of woodworking joints, including rabbets, dovetails and mortises. And while the best router is handheld for most operations, it can also be mounted in a router table, creating a small stationary shaper. Bosch CS5 Dust Collection
OSHA has proposed regulations that would raise standards of exposure for airborne crystalline silica, also known as silica dust. As Lauren Hunter of Hanley Wood wrote, "OSHA's proposed rule would reduce the current permissible exposure limit (PEL) from 100 μg/m3 (micrograms per cubic meter) to 50 μg/m3. Reminiscent of the Lead Renovation, Repair, and Painting rule, projects that would exceed the new silica dust limits limit would require the use of special tools, respirators, or other remedial measures."
Cordless tools are all the rage and there’s no doubting their incredible convenience. Cordless circular saws like Makita’s 18V X2 Rear-Handle Saw pack a lot more power than those first models did. But not everyone’s on board with the cordless craze when it comes to circular saws. In fact, you’ll probably see more corded models than cordless in many areas. Why? Reliable power and nearly infinite runtime. Choosing the best circular saw isn’t always easy, and there’s more to consider than just specs. So we got together with our Pros to do the shopping for you with our Pro Tool Reviews Best Circular Saw Buying Guide. Bosch CS5 Dust Collection
SquareTrade Protection Plans are only valid for new or Amazon certified refurbished products purchased at Amazon in the last 30 days. By purchasing this Protection Plan you agree to the Protection Plan Terms & Conditions (http://www.squaretrade.com/terms-standard). Your Protection Plan Terms & Conditions will be delivered via email within 24 hours of purchase Bosch CS5 Circular Saw Review

You can also make bevel cuts (angled across the edge of the wood) by adjusting the bevel settings on your saw and plunge cuts. With a little practice, you’ll even be able to manage miter cuts (angled across the face of the wood) and if you really feel like stretching your limits go ahead and try making some dadoes, rabbets, and lap joints with multiple passes.

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