Blade grinders work like a blender or a food processor with blades set to chop up the coffee beans. The problem with a blade grinder? Consistency. The blades chop the coffee beans, rather than consistently grinding them, making some pieces smaller than others. Since different sizes extract the coffee flavor at different rates, you may over extract the ground coffee. This over-extraction is what can cause a bitter flavor to your coffee.

Flat versus Conical burrs: There's much debate over which type of burr is better, but they perform pretty similarly, so you shouldn't worry too much about this point. Flat burrs are two parallel rings with a space between them where the beans enter to be sheared into coffee grounds, while conical burrs involve a cone in a ring that grinds your beans down to the right size. 

The clear winner between burr and blade when choosing a grinder is burr grinders: they provide a more consistent grind profile that is particularly suited to French press and pour over styles. Burrs are also more durable and dull at a slower pace than a blade grinder, and with more controlyou are able to create the grinds that are best suited to your personal taste.
A blade grinder will produce worse coffee than a burr grinder because it has no way to set a desired particle size. It simply spins around and around until it’s made most of the pieces smaller, and it yields many more fines and boulders than a grinder that uses burrs. With blade grinders, you get coffee that’s an unpleasant mixture of overextracted (more bitter) and underextracted (more sour), with most of the agreeable middle notes submerged.
The clear winner between burr and blade when choosing a grinder is burr grinders: they provide a more consistent grind profile that is particularly suited to French press and pour over styles. Burrs are also more durable and dull at a slower pace than a blade grinder, and with more controlyou are able to create the grinds that are best suited to your personal taste.
If uniform grind size for all grind types is your only criteria then the Mahlkonig EK43 could be considered the best coffee grinder. However, unless you have $2,500 burning a hole in your pocket it may not be the best grinder for you. The list below gives you a wide selection of great coffee grinders to choose from. One of them will certainly be the best coffee grinder for you.
There’s a pretty wide range of coffee grinders out there. Before you pick one, you’ll want to consider its capacity, power, speed, and ease of use. Some coffee grinders can grind 9 ounces of beans at a time, while others have up to 18 different speed settings. Many grinders on the market are electric, though manual grinders can be a more cost-effective choice.
The Compak is the type of machine the pros use at your local neighborhood cafe. It’s got the power (up to 850W!), the precision and the adjustability to produce quality ground coffee. It’s the biggest advantage over other options is that it transfers minimal heat to your beans after they grind. It’s also easy to operate thanks to programmable settings for single, double or manual dosing based on your preferences. Its biggest downside is size. Despite a relatively modest hopper size for a commercial grade machine, the Compak F10 Fresh takes up a large amount of counter space. Also on a confusing note, Compak decided to change the name from K10 to F10. They are the exact same machine so reviews for the K10 apply to the F10.
All of the entry-level electric burr grinders we recommend boast several different grind settings, from fine to coarse, depending on user preferences. Of course, the number of settings -- and actual distinctions between grind consistencies produced -- varies between models. These grinders also allow users to select the number of cups to be brewed, and the grinder will shut off automatically when the requisite amount of coffee has been ground.

The Compak is the type of machine the pros use at your local neighborhood cafe. It’s got the power (up to 850W!), the precision and the adjustability to produce quality ground coffee. It’s the biggest advantage over other options is that it transfers minimal heat to your beans after they grind. It’s also easy to operate thanks to programmable settings for single, double or manual dosing based on your preferences. Its biggest downside is size. Despite a relatively modest hopper size for a commercial grade machine, the Compak F10 Fresh takes up a large amount of counter space. Also on a confusing note, Compak decided to change the name from K10 to F10. They are the exact same machine so reviews for the K10 apply to the F10.
All of the entry-level electric burr grinders we recommend boast several different grind settings, from fine to coarse, depending on user preferences. Of course, the number of settings -- and actual distinctions between grind consistencies produced -- varies between models. These grinders also allow users to select the number of cups to be brewed, and the grinder will shut off automatically when the requisite amount of coffee has been ground.
The Infinity is on the quieter side and also features a safety lock, a sizeable beans hopper and grinds bin, and a timer that can be set from five to 60 seconds. There’s a cleaning brush included (although some customers recommend purchasing a larger option, like this one, separately) as well as a measuring scoop. And it’s worth noting that the grinds bin is not anti-static, so some users complain that the grinds tend to ‘jump’ around a bit and create a small mess when the bin is opened; however, this can be avoided by waiting a few seconds after grinding for everything to settle and by tapping on the sides of the bin. 
Pro Review:“The Baratza Virtuoso surely lives up to its expectations as one of the best burr coffee grinders in the world, offering users consistency in grind, and a super classic style. In a nutshell, with this coffee grinder, you’ll get a professional grade grinder, at home espresso-machine prices. (you’d be amazed at how expensive grinders can be)

“I think, for the money, the Helor Coffee hand grinder is the way to go for home use. It produces even and consistent particle size, which is extremely important in coffee brewing. I know people are sometimes weary of the involved effort of a hand grinder, but again, I believe they give you the best bang for your buck.” —Aric Carroll, operations manager, Sey Coffee
The variety of quality coffee equipment that is available today is amazing. As you can see from our list, there is a grinder that will fit your needs. Are you an aspiring coffee connoisseur? The Baratza Virtuoso gives you a commercial quality grind for a fraction of the price. Do you take your love of coffee on the road? One of the Hario manual burr grinders and an Aeropress are the perfect traveling companions. Or do you simply want a good cup of joe? The Capresso Infinity is an incredible deal for a quality burr grinder.
There’s a pretty wide range of coffee grinders out there. Before you pick one, you’ll want to consider its capacity, power, speed, and ease of use. Some coffee grinders can grind 9 ounces of beans at a time, while others have up to 18 different speed settings. Many grinders on the market are electric, though manual grinders can be a more cost-effective choice.
Different types of espresso/coffee machines require a different coarseness of grind. For example, a French press or pour-over uses very coarsely ground beans, standard drip coffee uses a medium-coarse grind, while espresso or Turkish coffee typically needs a very find grind. Too many small particles in the grind results in a bitter and acidic brew while too many large pieces in the mix can slow down brewing and lead to weak flavor. You need a coffee grinder that consistently produces an even grind of the coarseness-level that suits your various brewing needs.
Much like the somewhat controversial ceramic vs. steel debate, the “conical vs. flat burr“ debate is built on a lot of unproven theories. You may develop your own preferences, but overall, you’ll find that both types tend to produce the same quality of coffee. Claims that one brings out certain taste notes that the other doesn’t is mostly conjecture, but we won't openly argue with true coffee connoisseurs.
To properly maintain your grinder, it’s essential to be able to clean inside the burr chamber (especially if you have a taste for oiler, darker-roasted, or even-flavored coffees, which will leave residue you want to remove for flavor and grinder performance). Most of the machines we tested had easily-removable burr sets to allow for regular cleaning and, when the time is right, replacement. Ease of cleanup around the machine is important too, especially if a grinder is particularly naughty about spraying chaff everywhere. A little bit of mess is normal—and can depend on the type of coffee you grind and the level of humidity in your home—but not a lot.
Our previous budget pick, the Capresso Infinity, is a fine choice for its price, just under $100. The Infinity did well in our tests, though it’s better at grinding coffee into very fine particles than into coarse ones, and we found the usability a bit arbitrary, with the numbers on its timer switch indicating some duration of time that isn’t seconds. It has a heavier base than the OXO Brew Conical Burr Grinder and a pretty small countertop profile, which may appeal to some. But ultimately, we found the OXO to have a better range than the Capresso and a better set of extra features like an accurate timer and removable hopper.
The Preciso is at the high end of Baratza's consumer burr grinder lineup, offering incredibly precise (thus the name) adjustments to the grind that can be dialed in to your exact preferences. The Preciso is capable of fine, espresso-quality grinds, which you'll likely need if you have an at-home espresso maker, something some of the other grinders in Baratza's lineup have difficulty with. You'll pay for it though, the Preciso will set you back $300 at Amazon. It still offers Baratza's 40 individual grind options, the conical burr grinder at the top with a storage hopper for beans at the top and grinds at the bottom, and even packs a holder for your espresso filter so you can grind directly into it without having to grind into the hopper and disassemble it just to get one or two shots of espresso out of the grinder. Of course, while the Preciso is all about espresso, it works just fine for other brew methods as well, from drip to pour over, and is capable of coarse, even grinds as well. Indpendent reviewers tend to love the Preciso, and note that it's capable of a more consistent grind than some of the others in its family, and note that it's perfect for going from espresso to press in just a few clicks.
Finally, before we get to our recommendations, some grinders do better than others given a certain grind type so the grind type that you typically use may play a factor in selecting the best grinder for you. The grind types that you will need depends on your choice of brewing method. Below is a coffee grind chart and what brewing method uses that grind type:
You’ll want to steer clear of grinders that use spinning blades that chop your beans. Instead, opt for a conical burr grinder that crushes and pulverizes the coffee to your preferred fineness. Low speed trumps high speed, as the higher temperatures generated in the latter can change the flavor and character of the resulting grind. If the machine has a strong enough motor to power through the beans, reduction gears are unnecessary; for a less powerful motor, gearing turns high RPM into low-speed torque. The exact cost and specs are up to you — there are a myriad of options, both manual and automatic, all at different price points — but here are ten great places to start, and very possibly end, your search.
This little grinder holds lots of potential. It holds just under one cup of coffee, but the selling point is in its compact design: It goes where you go. The glass receptacle holds enough for you to have the coffee you want and remains small enough that you can pop it in a bag and take it along. It dissembles so easily that cleaning it is a breeze.
When updating our guide in 2018, we were eager to see how OXO’s new and more wallet-friendly burr grinder would perform. In a scaled-down version of our 2017 test, we ran the new OXO Brew Conical Burr Grinder up against our top pick, the Baratza Encore, and our previous budget pick, the Capresso Infinity. We measured the consistency of each grinder’s particle output using a Kruve sifter, visually compared the grind size, and brewed and tasted loads of coffee.

If you’ll be counting on your coffee grinder each day for that morning jolt you’ll want a model that fits conveniently on the counter or in a cabinet. Some bulkier models may wind up hidden away in a closet! It’s also important to assess how much capacity of coffee you want it to be able to grind at once so you won’t have to grind multiple batches at once. Some models even feature hoppers to hold your coffee beans at the ready.

The Cuisinart – DBM-8 and the Krups – GX5000 received high marks in our taste test, but both failed the durability, materials and grind consistency tests. Only the very finest settings created grinds fit for a French press, and the burrs seemed smaller and cheaper, making it hard for the grinds to be properly crushed. The buttons on the Cuisinart actually stopped working for a time during our initial testing. We unplugged it, wiggled the cord and plugged it in again. It worked, but we aren’t sure why.
The clear winner between burr and blade when choosing a grinder is burr grinders: they provide a more consistent grind profile that is particularly suited to French press and pour over styles. Burrs are also more durable and dull at a slower pace than a blade grinder, and with more controlyou are able to create the grinds that are best suited to your personal taste.
If you’re willing to pay more, the Baratza Virtuoso is a nearly identical grinder to the Encore, but it has a slightly speedier burr set, a timer-switch on the side, and a heavier base that helps the grinder stay in calibration. In a previous version of this guide, the Virtuoso was our top pick, but in more recent testing, we found the grind consistency comparable to that of the Encore. So, since you’re paying more for the features rather than the performance, we think it’s only worth the investment for serious coffee lovers.
The Preciso is at the high end of Baratza's consumer burr grinder lineup, offering incredibly precise (thus the name) adjustments to the grind that can be dialed in to your exact preferences. The Preciso is capable of fine, espresso-quality grinds, which you'll likely need if you have an at-home espresso maker, something some of the other grinders in Baratza's lineup have difficulty with. You'll pay for it though, the Preciso will set you back $300 at Amazon. It still offers Baratza's 40 individual grind options, the conical burr grinder at the top with a storage hopper for beans at the top and grinds at the bottom, and even packs a holder for your espresso filter so you can grind directly into it without having to grind into the hopper and disassemble it just to get one or two shots of espresso out of the grinder. Of course, while the Preciso is all about espresso, it works just fine for other brew methods as well, from drip to pour over, and is capable of coarse, even grinds as well. Indpendent reviewers tend to love the Preciso, and note that it's capable of a more consistent grind than some of the others in its family, and note that it's perfect for going from espresso to press in just a few clicks.
The 58mm burrs on this precise, professional-grade machine are powered by a 250W motor and stepless worm drive, which offers infinite adjustments and the torque to make quick work of a mess of beans. At 17 inches tall, the M4 still fits under most cabinets — and at 20 pounds, it won’t walk off your counter. Some lament the shelf in the catchment, which causes grinds to get stuck, but it’s a minor inconvenience for the quality of grinds that you’ll get.
With so many grinders to test, each with a multitude of options, it was a surprise that there was even a clear winner. Factoring in all the variables and the taste test, the Bodum – Bistro was the overall best electric grinder for everyday at home use. The Bodum allowed for stepless micro-adjustments between presets, offering lots of opportunity to dial in your grind for both pour over and French press.
The second benefit is the fact that it is often easier to adjust an electric version. With a lot of manual grinders, you will have to experiment a bit before you find the preferred size. With an electric grinder, you just have to memorize the right number or step and it should be a breeze to readjust to, say, your preferred setting for pour over coffee.
As with most electric burr grinders at this price range, this grinder offers a remarkable consistent grind suited for anything from a French press to an espresso machine to an Aeropress. This consistent grind seems to hold regardless of which of the 15 settings this grinder boasts you decide to use. This should ensure consistent extraction for the perfect cup of coffee every time.

During the grinding process, we timed how fast each grinder performed at different settings as well as how easy each was to use and clean. We also paid attention to ancillary issues like whether the machines were noisy or made a huge mess on the countertop, and we kept an eye out for potential durability issues or weaknesses in workmanship as well.
This question can first be answered directly then needs some clarification… Regardless of the brewing method, the more coffee grinds you use, the higher the caffeine content of the finished drink. This is simple math and common sense. That said, the type of coffee bean and roast level have far more of an overall effect on caffeine levels. Robusta beans have double the caffeine content of Arabica hence they are so frequently used for espresso. Lighter roasts counter-intuitively have a higher level of caffeine than darker roasts. The temperature of the water, brewing time and, of course, the volume of your finished drink also impact caffeine content so there are many factors to consider, the amount of grounds being just one of them.
While the Hario Skerton is less stable than the Porlex hand grinder, its separate parts make it an ideal travel companion: A screw-top lid is included in the package, making it possible to remove the grinder top, seal the bottom bowl, and use it as a storage unit for freshly hand-ground coffee. The ceramic burrs are long-lasting and precise, offering an incredibly even grind particle size for a manual grinder. As with the Porlex (and basically every other hand-powered grinder in existence), adjustments to the grind-particle size are something of a pain to make, but the accuracy and uniformity of the grind once you settle on the right one is hard to beat at the price.
You’ll find the Anfim in your artisan coffee shop. It has one of the most technologically advanced timers found today on a grinder — measuring your dose to 1/100th a second. With gigantic 75mm hardened steel burrs with titanium blades and 0.6 HP motor, you could use the Super Caimano to power your sink disposal or open your garage door. The doser on the Anfim is legendary; it started a whole trend towards “never touch the coffee” because it doses a nice cone into a portafilter basket. At 22 inches tall, it won’t fit under cabinets, but it’s small by commercial standards, taking up about two thirds the space of the Compak K10, even with the 4.4–pound hopper. While the grind selection isn’t stepless, it does offer 90 subtle fineness changes.
A blade grinder will produce worse coffee than a burr grinder because it has no way to set a desired particle size. It simply spins around and around until it’s made most of the pieces smaller, and it yields many more fines and boulders than a grinder that uses burrs. With blade grinders, you get coffee that’s an unpleasant mixture of overextracted (more bitter) and underextracted (more sour), with most of the agreeable middle notes submerged.
In terms of design, I had previously been using the Hario Mini Mill. It was a competent grinder, but it was cheaply built and had a tendency to stick and pop the handle off. Immediately the superior build quality and overall design on the Handground stood out. Visually, it's a beautiful grinder to have sitting at my desk, and the integrated handle functions better both in terms of being incapable of falling off and being a better ergonomic approach. The container at the bottom is made of a heavy glass, while the hopper and top are plastic. The grinding handle is a very solid metal and wood combination that reinforces the elegant design approach. In general, it takes longer to grind the same amount of coffee compared to the Hario, but it's far more comfortable.
Every grinder crushes beans between two burrs, but not all burr sets are created equal. They can be made of steel, ceramic, or even plastic (not ideal). Durable burrs made of material like steel last over time and are easy to maintain and clean with a stiff brush. Steel burrs are less expensive to produce and thus are more common, while ceramic burrs are harder and dull more slowly. Some burrs are conical while others are flat. A conical burr shape grinds coffee evenly enough for the home user and—experts say—collects less coffee between the burrs than a flat one, making it easier to clean.

Takeaway: Pouring grinds into a coffee filter, not to mention cleanup, is easy with the KitchenAid BCG111's signature feature: a removable stainless steel grinding bowl. Some users say the look is a bit clunky, but the overall package (including performance) wins over the vast majority. There are experts who say this blade grinder works better than some costlier burr grinders.


This little grinder holds lots of potential. It holds just under one cup of coffee, but the selling point is in its compact design: It goes where you go. The glass receptacle holds enough for you to have the coffee you want and remains small enough that you can pop it in a bag and take it along. It dissembles so easily that cleaning it is a breeze.
Savoring a warm cup in the solitude of a quiet morning before the rest of the animals stir goes out the window with the operation of industrial machinery. The Rocky will stir nary a mouse: this classic grinder and its heavy-duty motor are 50% quieter than most other low speed or reduction gear models. Fifty-five settings will match even the most particular barista; durability ensures you pass it down to your kids. Go with the doserless version — the doser model is not adjustable and difficult to clean. And as with the Gaggia, each unit is tested before being shipped, so don’t be alarmed if you find any residual coffee grounds.
As with everything in the kitchen, the best tasting coffee begins with the freshest ingredients paired with the right tool to create quality beverages. At Williams Sonoma, we offer all coffee lovers the best of both: ingredients and tools for a perfect cup of coffee right at home. Our coffee grinders range from vintage hand-crank coffee mills to electric coffee grinders that transform whole roasted coffee beans into ground coffee quickly and concisely, which is the first step to creating a coffee cup to rival your favorite coffee house. Consider yourself warned, the fresh ground coffee beans and the alluring caffeinated aroma of these tabletop treasures will spoil you. Convenient and affordable electric coffee grinders will prove they are a necessity for anyone who drinks coffee, from those who want a casual cup now and again to the serious coffee connoisseurs, whose world, personality and mood all depend on their first sip of the day.
Most coffee grinders should be suitable for any type of bean you’re brewing, be it a dark or light roast. What does matter is what kind of coffee brewing method you prefer. Different brewing methods require different kinds of grinds, ranging from extra-coarse to extra-fine, so determining what your preferred method of making coffee is will help narrow down your search for the most suitable grinder.

Great coffee starts with great grinding. The size, texture and consistency of coffee grounds all affect the taste and quality of coffee overall—and coffee grinders dictate these characteristics in every batch of coffee. Having a quality coffee grinder can make all the difference in the brewing process for drip coffee, espresso and other coffee beverages. A high-performing coffee grinder will ensure precision and consistency with every grind, while a low-quality coffee grinder will lead to slower grinding times, uneven grinds and subpar brewing overall. For the best coffee grinders in both the residential and commercial coffee-making industries, there is no better place to shop than right here at Seattle Coffee Gear.
First, select your beans and coffee machine of choice for a single cup, a full pot or a cold brew coffee concentrate. There are a wide variety of coffee beans, roasts, and flavors that work fine with any of our electric grinders and coffee makers. However, our exclusive Equator World Coffee Selection is a terrific place to start to find your favorites. Because the beans are selected based on their season, they are always picked at the peak of freshness, making the coffee beans in this collection an ever-changing variety waiting to be discovered anew each delivery. The beans are light and medium roasted just prior to shipping directly to you. The beans then can be freshly ground with one of our premium electric coffee grinders to release the flavor potential and aroma pot by pot.
The Baratza Encore is an automatic conical burr grinder, complete with a storage bun on the top for all of your coffee and a capture container for the ground coffee at the bottom. It sports over 40 different grind settings, and as far as automatic grinders go, it's relatively affordable at about $130 at Amazon. A quick twist of the knob on the side will give you coffee perfectly ground for whatever your favorite coffee preparation may be, whether it's drip, press, or pour-over. The Encore may not be the objective best Baratza grinder, but it's certainly the best for home coffee enthusiasts or people who aren't willing to spend hundreds upon hundreds just to get a good consistent grind every morning. It's been lauded by coffee reviewers (and criticized, more on that in a moment), and it does a good job of getting a consistent grind without heating up your coffee beans or getting too loud (although it's not particularly quiet, either.) The Encore is the successor to the immensely popular Maestro, and follows in its footsteps in both design and build quality. It's a sturdy, reliable grinder, and many of you particularly highlighted Baratza's superior customer service should you run into problems with it.
So, don’t expect to use the Porlex as an affordable alternative to an electric grinder, especially if you ever want to brew more than one cup at a time. But there is a time and a place for a good manual grinder: when you aren’t preparing very much coffee to be served at once, and when you are traveling either to a grinder-less, coffee-shop-free location or spending a long period of time in the great outdoors. In those circumstances, the Porlex will make the grinding process easier, if not effortless.
The Cuisinart – DBM-8 and the Krups – GX5000 received high marks in our taste test, but both failed the durability, materials and grind consistency tests. Only the very finest settings created grinds fit for a French press, and the burrs seemed smaller and cheaper, making it hard for the grinds to be properly crushed. The buttons on the Cuisinart actually stopped working for a time during our initial testing. We unplugged it, wiggled the cord and plugged it in again. It worked, but we aren’t sure why.
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