Who this is for: The Cuisinart CPK-17 PerfecTemp Cordless Electric Kettle is for anyone who needs to bring water to a boil to make French press coffee, pour-over coffee, or tea. The Bonavita BV382510V 1.0L Digital Variable Temperature Gooseneck Kettle is best for people preparing pour-over coffee (the gooseneck offers better aim), or for tea lovers who will geek out over its spot-on temperature accuracy.
An electric drip coffee maker can also be referred to as a dripolator. It normally works by admitting water from a cold water reservoir into a flexible hose in the base of the reservoir leading directly to a thin metal tube or heating chamber (usually, of aluminum), where a heating element surrounding the metal tube heats the water. The heated water moves through the machine using the thermosiphon principle. Thermally-induced pressure and the siphoning effect move the heated water through an insulated rubber or vinyl riser hose, into a spray head, and onto the ground coffee, which is contained in a brew basket mounted below the spray head. The coffee passes through a filter and drips down into the carafe. A one-way valve in the tubing prevents water from siphoning back into the reservoir. A thermostat attached to the heating element turns off the heating element as needed to prevent overheating the water in the metal tube (overheating would produce only steam in the supply hose), then turns back on when the water cools below a certain threshold. For a standard 10-12 cup drip coffeemaker, using a more powerful thermostatically-controlled heating element (in terms of wattage produced), can heat increased amounts of water more quickly using larger heating chambers, generally producing higher average water temperatures at the spray head over the entire brewing cycle. This process can be further improved by changing the aluminum construction of most heating chambers to a metal with superior heat transfer qualities, such as copper.
The Mr. Coffee 10-cup also comes equipped with a thermal carafe. Though it has definitely substandard thermal retention compared with other carafes we’ve tested (the coffee went from 180 degrees freshly brewed to 164 in the span of half an hour and fell under the “drinkably hot” threshold of 150 by the time a full hour elapsed), it’s still a good option for users who like to brew a pot of coffee and bring it over to their desk. Uninsulated glass carafes like those on the other machines we tested would have fared far worse were it not for the hot plates beneath them.
In later years, coffeemakers began to adopt more standardized forms commensurate with a large increase in the scale of production required to meet postwar consumer demand. Plastics and composite materials began to replace metal, particularly with the advent of newer electric drip coffeemakers in the 1970s. During the 1990s, consumer demand for more attractive appliances to complement expensive modern kitchens resulted in a new wave of redesigned coffeemakers in a wider range of available colors and styles.
At the end of the day (or, rather, the very beginning), drip coffee makers are the most efficient way to make large quantities of coffee. And since most machines are fundamentally the same, we explored each one for nice-to-have touches that set it apart from the rest, from intuitive interfaces to programmable brew times to pre-infusing technology — a technique that puts hot water into contact with more surface area around each ground throughout the brewing process, improving the final product.
Coffeemakers or coffee machines are cooking appliances used to brew coffee. While there are many different types of coffeemakers using a number of different brewing principles, in the most common devices, coffee grounds are placed in a paper or metal filter inside a funnel, which is set over a glass or ceramic coffee pot, a cooking pot in the kettle family. Cold water is poured into a separate chamber, which is then heated up to the boiling point, and directed into the funnel. This is also called automatic drip-brew.
I love this coffee pot so much! When my first one of 5 years quit, I purchased the exact same one and when that one quits, I will be purchasing a third. I use it heavily between my husband and I. It is on at least 4 hours everyday and love that the 1-4 cup option makes the coffee stronger mmmm.... I use the 1-4 cup button every time even if it is a full pot brew and you can TELL the difference in the strength. I have always used filtered water because the taste of water can drastically change the quality and taste of the brew. Even though this has a metal mesh filter (that filters surprisingly well), I always use paper filters with it so I have never used the charcoal filter and never have to run the cleaner. Using the paper and clean ... full review

An electric drip coffee maker can also be referred to as a dripolator. It normally works by admitting water from a cold water reservoir into a flexible hose in the base of the reservoir leading directly to a thin metal tube or heating chamber (usually, of aluminum), where a heating element surrounding the metal tube heats the water. The heated water moves through the machine using the thermosiphon principle. Thermally-induced pressure and the siphoning effect move the heated water through an insulated rubber or vinyl riser hose, into a spray head, and onto the ground coffee, which is contained in a brew basket mounted below the spray head. The coffee passes through a filter and drips down into the carafe. A one-way valve in the tubing prevents water from siphoning back into the reservoir. A thermostat attached to the heating element turns off the heating element as needed to prevent overheating the water in the metal tube (overheating would produce only steam in the supply hose), then turns back on when the water cools below a certain threshold. For a standard 10-12 cup drip coffeemaker, using a more powerful thermostatically-controlled heating element (in terms of wattage produced), can heat increased amounts of water more quickly using larger heating chambers, generally producing higher average water temperatures at the spray head over the entire brewing cycle. This process can be further improved by changing the aluminum construction of most heating chambers to a metal with superior heat transfer qualities, such as copper.
Nikki Miller, manager of Cafe Grumpy in New York City, told us that a coffee maker is responsible for three things: heating the water to the optimal range of 195 to 205 degrees F, distributing water evenly over the coffee grounds, and allowing the grounds to brew for between four and eight minutes. Water that is too cold or a brew time that is too short will under-extract the coffee, causing a thin or sour taste. Over-extraction, on the other hand, can leave coffee burnt-tasting or bitter.
If you only need one cup of coffee, a pour-over coffee maker like this one from Melitta is ideal. This simple plastic cone acts as a reusable filter when paired with a paper filter. You simply set it on your coffee mug, add a number 2 paper filter, spoon some coffee in the filter, pour boiling water over the grounds, and watch it drip right into your mug.

CR’s take: The Cuisinart Coffee on Demand DCC-3000 is a self-serve coffee maker, meaning it forgoes a carafe and has you fill a mug straight from its heated reservoir. This model does well in our tests, and Cuisinart self-serve machines receive an Excellent rating for owner satisfaction. The feature set includes a removable reservoir, a permanent filter, a water filter, a cleaning indicator, auto-shutoff, programming, and a small-batch setting.
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