Your shower head is prone to buildup of all sorts of nasty stuff, and it can be a pain to clean if you do it the hard way. As Redditor IT_Serpent points out, you can cure your shower head of its grimy blockage with a bag of vinegar. All you have to do is fill the bag, place it around the shower head so it's submerged in the liquid, and tie it to the neck with a twist tie (or anything else, really). Leave it there overnight and the cleaning will be handled for you.
Remove the shower head from the vinegar, and wipe it off with a rag. The mineral deposits should wipe right off. If the deposits do not come off easily try soaking the shower head again for another 30 minutes or so. Also, for stubborn deposits or stains, use an old toothbrush to scrub them gently. A paperclip can also be used to clear the little jet holes in the shower head.
There are many reasons to make cleaning with vinegar a regular part of your housekeeping routine. First, it's inexpensive, virtually pennies for each cleaning. You'll save several dollars by not purchasing unnecessary specialty cleaners. And given that it's all natural, there are no harsh chemicals or fumes to worry about. You can even use it to clean children's bedrooms and bathrooms with no additional concerns. 
Is your showerhead blocked by unsightly calcium deposits? Hard water, particularly from wells, can be high in calcium, magnesium, lime, silica and other minerals. Once hard water passing through a showerhead dries, it leaves behind deposits. This mineral buildup is both unattractive and problematic, as it can plug up the waterways, and prevent your showerhead from flowing at full blast.
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Remove the shower head from the shower arm and place it in a bucket or other container deep enough so the head will be covered with the cleaning material. Use a rag to cover the nut connecting the shower head to the shower arm. With the rag in place use some locking pliers or a wrench to loosen the nut. For more information about removing your shower head, view how to remove/replace a shower head.

These days many shower heads are made from flexible rubber. This means, you are saved from removing the shower head as well. Then how do you do it? You can just use your fingers and massage the nozzles to eliminate the clogging. Alternatively, you may use a toothbrush to clean the nozzles too. In basic terms, what this means is that you can solely use fingers or a toothbrush to realize your objective.
Scrubbing the stains with a dry brush could be sufficient for fresh salt stains. The goal is to remove as much salt from the concrete as possible, so try to clean it carefully. If you just brush the salt off, but it sits on another part of the drive or in the dirt immediately next to the drive, it could re-enter the concrete. Using a vacuum to grab the particles from brushing the stain might help.
I’d like to offer a second option as a solution for a chalky, clogged, old showerhead – replace it! In this video, I show you how to remove your old showerhead and install a new one (or the same one, once it’s been cleaned). Note: if you want to salvage your old showerhead, you’ll have better luck cleaning it when it’s off the shower arm so you can get at it from the inside as well.
Here is what you can do, make a paste of baking soda with warm water. Wear a pair of gloves to protect your hands as baking soda is abrasive by nature and apply this mixture on the shower head. Our advice would be not letting it sit longer and then cleaning it with a soft cotton cloth. Remember to rinse it thoroughly with water and then see the magic!
Although it's very safe to use, you will want to take some precautions when using vinegar as a cleaner. First, be sure to avoid contact with the eyes. If any vinegar gets in your eyes, promptly rinse the entire eye with fresh water, until the sting has completely dissipated. Also, note that while it's safe to use vinegar to clean areas where children play, it's best to do so when they aren't present. Like adults, children shouldn't consume large amounts of vinegar, so be sure to store it out of their reach.
Cleaning your shower head is much easier with regular maintenance. Spray your shower head with a commercial shower product each week, then wipe it down with a clean cloth. Use the bag of vinegar method to treat the fixture every 3-6 months. The actual cleaning frequency depends on how hard your water is. If you have very hard water, consider installing a shower filter or a water softening system to reduce limescale buildup.
Thanks for visiting our shower head cleaning web page. We’ve got a big community of viewers who regularly share their suggestions plus we present either side of the matter and the pros and cons also. As essential an issue as this is you don’t want to be un- imformed. After all, minus the details, how can we fully understand we are making a good choice?
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Sometimes a shower head is so outdated or corroded that it makes more sense to replace it than clean it. In most cases, you can select a different shower head and screw it into place. In older bathrooms, the shower head may be a permanent fixture. With no way to unscrew the old fixture, you may have to remove it with a hacksaw and splice the shower arm with another piece of pipe. An Expert can help guide you through this process.
Thanks for visiting our shower head cleaning web page. We’ve got a big community of viewers who regularly share their suggestions plus we present either side of the matter and the pros and cons also. As essential an issue as this is you don’t want to be un- imformed. After all, minus the details, how can we fully understand we are making a good choice?

What no? No ways, is it the drinking cola that we are talking about? Yes, we are and it comes as no surprise with all the video demonstrations, that Coca Cola has massive cleaning power. Moreover, it fresh cola has pH balance of 2.0 and it is phosphoric acid that is at work by this time. All you need to dip your shower head into Coca Cola and then wipe it a little. Clean it with hot soapy water and you are good to go.

Taking a shower is something many Americans do every single day. Sometimes multiple showers in a day! But, cleaning your shower doesn’t happen every day, and when it does, it likely avoids cleaning the shower head! With all the spray holes, tiny spaces between, and hard-water build-up and grossness, we avoid it, and just deal with whatever water pressure it puts out.

Many cleaning products are specifically designed to combat limescale, and these products are easy to use (and often take much less time than the vinegar method!). Just follow the directions on the label, take any necessary safety precautions, and test the product in a small area first before proceeding. Make sure to rinse the shower head thoroughly before using the shower as normal.


If the staining is caused by efflorescence, you can seal the driveway to limit water exposure to the concrete. However, water can still enter the concrete through the ground, so it is best to seal the concrete after several cleanings of the efflorescence. You could attempt to prompt the efflorescence (soak the driveway with water and wait), clean and repeat until the stains barely return.
Although it's very safe to use, you will want to take some precautions when using vinegar as a cleaner. First, be sure to avoid contact with the eyes. If any vinegar gets in your eyes, promptly rinse the entire eye with fresh water, until the sting has completely dissipated. Also, note that while it's safe to use vinegar to clean areas where children play, it's best to do so when they aren't present. Like adults, children shouldn't consume large amounts of vinegar, so be sure to store it out of their reach.
I use The Works chemical cleaner. You can get it at any Dollar store. There is no scrubbing and there is no eating holes in anything. My entire shower stall turns brown, so I had tried vinegar and all those little tricks, only to loose the battle. I use the works, then spray a little rain-x on the shower stall. The rain-x helps keep a film over the fiberglass stall so the gunk has nothing to stick to. Hope this helps.

Never mind my earlier question. I should’ve watched the video BEFORE I submitted my question. The video answered my question. It’s much simpler than I was thinking. I was trying to avoid having to detach the hose from the spout coming out of the wall. But after watching that video, I see that that’s not necessary, that I can just let it soak in vinegar in the bag while it hangs on its hook. So please disregard my earlier question. Once again, thanks for the handy dandy tip!!


But, if you’ve got limescale in other areas of your bathroom, it’s no surprise that the shower head is going to be blocked with limescale, too – after all, it’s where all the water comes out of! Take a look at your shower head and you’ll probably see that it’s covered in limescale; the small holes might even be completely blocked, depending on how hard the water in your area is.

We are noticing that our clothes, particularly black ones, come out of the wash looking a bit scummy. However, we have determined that it is not actually our detergent (used other washers). We’re wondering if we are getting mineral deposits on our clothes. Would simply cleaning the washer be effective, or should we also be adding something to our wash water besides our detergent?


If you have a shower head that is on the end of a flexible hose, there will be a nut (usually plastic) where the head is attached to the hose. Try to loosen the nut with your hands first. If that doesn't work, use your pipe wrench to loosen the nut. On a head without a flexible hose, there should be a nut on the shower arm that connects the shower head to the wall. Using the rags to cushion the metal beneath both tools, unscrew the nut with the pipe wrench while holding the shower head with the pliers. For most shower heads, the saying, “righty tighty, lefty loosey” will help you remember which direction to turn.
Melissa Maker is an entrepreneur, cleaning expert, founder of Toronto’s most popular boutique cleaning service, and star of the Clean My Space channel on YouTube (but she still hates to clean!). Every week, Melissa delivers new videos dishing expert advice on cleaning products, tools, DIY substitutes, and practical, timesaving solutions to everyday problems. Melissa has appeared on the Today Show, and has been featured in InStyle, Real Simple, and Better Homes and Gardens.
I’m trying this with a faucet that is so blocked up there’s almost no water coming through — and it was new in 2009! I’ve tied a zip bag full of vinegar around the end of the spout and am crossing my fingers. We have terribly hard water that leaves lime/calcium deposits on everything; I have to wipe down the glass in my shower every time it’s used, or I get water spots immediately!
There are millions of cleaning products out there designed to help us clean away all the crazy buildup that water can leave on our showers, each one claiming to be better than the last. There are cleaners for soap scum, hard water, descaling, unclogging things, and polishing other things.  Of course, as with most things, the best solution is the simplest! I’ve heard about this one before, but didn’t really believe that it would work that well for me, especially because we have crazy minerally well water out here.
Fix-It Friday is an exclusive Women You Should Know® editorial series authored by seasoned veteran of home improvement, Norma Vally, the former host of Discovery Home Channel’s series “Toolbelt Diva” and a show on Sirius Satellite Radio by the same name. The weekly column is designed to inspire women – weekend warriors, aspiring handywomen, and even seasoned DIYers – to take on home repairs and maintenance projects with confidence and gusto.

You need a piece of old rag so this is where the old clothes or sheets you’ve kept to make cloths come into their own. Soak the rag in vinegar. After squeezing out the excess, wrap the cloth around the tap (or faucet) for 10 minutes. You can use elastic bands to hold the cloth in place, if necessary. Remove the cloth and use an old toothbrush to remove any stubborn dirt or limescale. Finally, using a soft, dry cloth buff up your lovely shiny tap.

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