To remove hard water deposits from the toilet, wear waterproof gloves and use a plastic scrubby square. I tried using a knife, which was effective, but it too easily scratched the porcelain. I used the scrubby on another area, got better results, and no visible scratches. You may also drain the water below the deposit by plunging to avoid any splashing.

Your shower head is prone to buildup of all sorts of nasty stuff, and it can be a pain to clean if you do it the hard way. As Redditor IT_Serpent points out, you can cure your shower head of its grimy blockage with a bag of vinegar. All you have to do is fill the bag, place it around the shower head so it's submerged in the liquid, and tie it to the neck with a twist tie (or anything else, really). Leave it there overnight and the cleaning will be handled for you.
To remove hard water deposits from the toilet, wear waterproof gloves and use a plastic scrubby square. I tried using a knife, which was effective, but it too easily scratched the porcelain. I used the scrubby on another area, got better results, and no visible scratches. You may also drain the water below the deposit by plunging to avoid any splashing.

Fill a spray bottle with undiluted lemon juice; add a couple drops of dish soap as a surfactant if you want but don’t overdo it; it’s the lemon juice that does the work. Spray all surfaces repeatedly (letting it soak after each application), until you see some results. When you first start, it will appear to have no more effect than spraying water, but, eventually the stains will start to “run”. Once the lemon juice has loosened the scale, you can use a non-abrasive scrubbing pad with Soft Scrub or Bon Ami to remove it.


I am so fed up. I have tried EVERYTHING on the windows in Palm Bay, FL where there is horrible well water. The water softener does not make the water right. My brand new dishwasher even has a white film on my dishes. The windows I have washed over eight times using everything, even muriatic acid. It just left more white film. I am so tired of cleaning to no avail. What do PROFESSIONALS use to get the white film and marks off of windows?
Detach the shower head and, after consulting the manufacturer’s instructions for information specific to the model you own, extract the filter screen. (This can usually be found near the point where the shower head attaches to the water supply pipe.) Run the filter under the faucet while gently scrubbing it with a toothbrush. Once it’s clean, reassemble and reinstall the shower head and test it.
Detach the shower head and, after consulting the manufacturer’s instructions for information specific to the model you own, extract the filter screen. (This can usually be found near the point where the shower head attaches to the water supply pipe.) Run the filter under the faucet while gently scrubbing it with a toothbrush. Once it’s clean, reassemble and reinstall the shower head and test it.
These days many shower heads are made from flexible rubber. This means, you are saved from removing the shower head as well. Then how do you do it? You can just use your fingers and massage the nozzles to eliminate the clogging. Alternatively, you may use a toothbrush to clean the nozzles too. In basic terms, what this means is that you can solely use fingers or a toothbrush to realize your objective.

Keeping your shower and tub free of soap scum (residue left behind by bar soap), will also allow the minerals that are present in your water to wash down the drain, rather than stick to the soap scum. A portable steam cleaner makes quick work of the soap scum removal, and can be purchased for minimum investment. Using a daily shower spray, is another cheap and easy way to keep soap scum at bay. You might also consider waxing the surfaces in your shower, after you've removed all the soap scum. This will prevent new soap scum from forming.


If you are like many of us, the shower might be the only place where you can find a little peace and quiet. But over time, mineral deposits can plug up the spray holes and make your shower experience less pleasant and less effective. When your showerhead starts sputtering, there's no need to reach for harsh chemical cleaning products. Distilled white vinegar can clean your showerhead and restore the water flow so you can take long, luxurious showers again.
These days many shower heads are made from flexible rubber. This means, you are saved from removing the shower head as well. Then how do you do it? You can just use your fingers and massage the nozzles to eliminate the clogging. Alternatively, you may use a toothbrush to clean the nozzles too. In basic terms, what this means is that you can solely use fingers or a toothbrush to realize your objective.
Try buying LemiShine detergent booster at your grocery store next to the dishwasher detergent. Fill part of your dispenser or throw a little in the bottom of your dishwasher every time you run it and after several uses you will begin to notice your glasses start to look like new and it keeps your dishwasher looking good inside too. My husband and I battled this problem for years until a friend told me about LemiShine and I couldn’t believe how well it worked!

Removing the shower head to clean it is by far the most effective method, and is relatively easy. However, it is important that you use caution and monitor the process closely if you have a shower head with a designer finish like oil rubbed bronze, brushed nickel, or antique copper. Chrome will stand up to straight table vinegar with no problems, but if you have any other finish we recommend taking a cotton swab and testing a small, inconspicuous area for up to 30 minutes before you use this method on your whole shower head.

Step 1—scrubbing the shower head nozzles with a toothbrush—may not manage to remove all mineral deposits. That’s OK: You can clean off the remainder with household vinegar, whose mild acidity actually dissolves the deposits. To do this, fill a plastic bag with vinegar, then fit the bag over the shower head so that the nozzles are completely submerged. Secure the bag with a zip tie or binder clip, leaving it in place for several hours or overnight. Remember to run the shower for a minute before jumping in to bathe—you don’t want to end up smelling like salad dressing, do you?
Your shower head is prone to buildup of all sorts of nasty stuff, and it can be a pain to clean if you do it the hard way. As Redditor IT_Serpent points out, you can cure your shower head of its grimy blockage with a bag of vinegar. All you have to do is fill the bag, place it around the shower head so it's submerged in the liquid, and tie it to the neck with a twist tie (or anything else, really). Leave it there overnight and the cleaning will be handled for you.
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