Standard wall mount – These fixed wall mounts are the most economical option, although models with more features can be pricier. They offer an array of amenities, including filtration for hard water systems, multi-spray settings, and anti-tarnish finishes. However, they do not provide very much flexibility. Tall users may have to duck to wash their hair, and short users may have difficulty avoiding a stream of water directly in their face.
avoid paying avoid plumbing baking baking soda based cleaners cheap shower chemical reaction clean cleaned whenever clogged drain cleaners efficient shower efficient shower heads energy bill enzyme based floor damage frozen pipe frozen pipes garbage disposal garbage disposals kitchen sink limescale lint trap overflow holes plumbing issue plumbing issues plumbing problem plumbing problems plumbing repairs plumbing skills plumbing system plumbing tips regular basis save money septic system septic tank septic tank pumped shower showerhead shower heads taking care tank pumped toilet bowl total bill vinegar
Is your showerhead blocked by unsightly calcium deposits? Hard water, particularly from wells, can be high in calcium, magnesium, lime, silica and other minerals. Once hard water passing through a showerhead dries, it leaves behind deposits. This mineral buildup is both unattractive and problematic, as it can plug up the waterways, and prevent your showerhead from flowing at full blast.

Norma Vally, the former host of Discovery Home Channel’s series “Toolbelt Diva” and a show on Sirius Satellite Radio by the same name. The weekly column is designed to inspire women – weekend warriors, aspiring handywomen, and even seasoned DIYers – to take on home repairs and maintenance projects with confidence and gusto. Fix-It Friday is an exclusive Women You Should Know® editorial series authored by seasoned veteran of home improvement,
Spraying white vinegar on your windows and shower doors can remove mineral stains left from hard water. You can use leftover white wine to remove limescale from glass. If the spray dries too fast, soak a paper towel with the vinegar and press it against the limescale, then tape a piece of plastic wrap over the paper towel to hold in the moisture. Check back every 30-60 minutes to see if the limescale has softened enough to be scraped off. How long it will take to soak will depend on how much buildup is present.
I live in San Diego, where we get our water from the Colorado River. This is excellent, life-giving water; a gift from the gods. However, it has a lot of dissolved solids from its passage through the canyons of the West. I installed a new glass shower two years ago, which has been used daily since it was installed. My son, the user, is very conscientious about squeegeeing every time, but it has built up a film, which I assumed was calcium or phosphate or some other kind of mineral build-up from the hard water.
Remove the shower head from the vinegar, and wipe it off with a rag. The mineral deposits should wipe right off. If the deposits do not come off easily try soaking the shower head again for another 30 minutes or so. Also, for stubborn deposits or stains, use an old toothbrush to scrub them gently. A paperclip can also be used to clear the little jet holes in the shower head.
Basically, a shower head (like mine, pictured in this post), is constantly spouting water out, every day at your beck and call.  Naturally, water has calcium and other mineral deposits which over time can (and will) clog faucets, showerheads and coffeemakers (have you seen our blog post on cleaning a Keurig yet?).  This isn’t harmful per se, it just slows the flow.  It constipates, if you will, your system.
Water massage settings have been around for years, but there are some other truly new features in today’s showerhead market, such as built-in bluetooth speakers and color-changing LED lights. If turning your shower into a disco isn’t your thing, you might try a thermostatic shut-off valve. This feature will automatically shut off your shower once it warms up to the desired temperature, saving water and taking the guesswork out of getting your shower just right. When you’re ready to get in, just tug the cord to resume water flow. 

Scrubbing the stains with a dry brush could be sufficient for fresh salt stains. The goal is to remove as much salt from the concrete as possible, so try to clean it carefully. If you just brush the salt off, but it sits on another part of the drive or in the dirt immediately next to the drive, it could re-enter the concrete. Using a vacuum to grab the particles from brushing the stain might help.

With a wet scrubber sponge, wipe down the first area, using wide strokes to cover the most surface in the least amount of time, then rinse the sponge. Fill a cup with water and rinse the cleaned area. When the first section is done, spray the third section, then wipe and rinse the second, followed by the third. For any remaining grout stains, mix up one part bleach and two parts water in a spray bottle. Let it soak in for a few minutes. Turn on the shower for a minute so it can self-rinse, and give any outside-of-the-stream spots a quick splash with your cup.
Every homeowner wants a home that’s clean and attractive, welcoming to visitors.  Vinyl floors are common options in kitchens and bathrooms, and they are beautiful when properly maintained. This flooring is also a popular choice for homeowners because of their durability. While a quick sweep and mop usually clean routine dust and dirt, deep cleaning is a good idea when you want your floors to look like new again!  If you’re wondering how to clean vinyl floors when scuffs or stains mar their beauty, we’ve included a few tips below. The Best Way to Clean a Vinyl Floor Deep cleaning …
Scrubbing the stains with a dry brush could be sufficient for fresh salt stains. The goal is to remove as much salt from the concrete as possible, so try to clean it carefully. If you just brush the salt off, but it sits on another part of the drive or in the dirt immediately next to the drive, it could re-enter the concrete. Using a vacuum to grab the particles from brushing the stain might help.
I agree with Lynn’s tip about the spray and walk away foaming-type products. I tried them all and I finally found a winner. My water spots were really severe and a friend told me about Bruce’s heavy duty brown, a paste that you wipe on and rinse off. Now the water just rolls off the glass instead of sticking to it. Ace Hardware has it and it’s only like five bucks.
So, how do you get rid of all that dirt? Easy peasy. Use Viakal Limescale Remover Spray directly on the shower head and, if it’s a particularly stubborn stain, leave it for up to five minutes. After that, arm yourself with sponge and scrub it gently. You’ll see that the limescale will dissolve and your shower head should no longer be blocked! Using Viakal regularly will mean that you can keep on top of limescale build-up and prevent it from becoming an issue again.

I use The Works chemical cleaner. You can get it at any Dollar store. There is no scrubbing and there is no eating holes in anything. My entire shower stall turns brown, so I had tried vinegar and all those little tricks, only to loose the battle. I use the works, then spray a little rain-x on the shower stall. The rain-x helps keep a film over the fiberglass stall so the gunk has nothing to stick to. Hope this helps.
×