It is unusual to find showerheads which cannot be removed from their fittings, but if yours is one of the few, you can still clean it of limescale. Fill a plastic bag with vinegar and tie it securely with a rubber band around the showerhead. Make sure it is fully immersed. Once again leave it overnight and then run the shower to see how clean it is. The video above shows exactly how to do this.
So, how do you get rid of all that dirt? Easy peasy. Use Viakal Limescale Remover Spray directly on the shower head and, if it’s a particularly stubborn stain, leave it for up to five minutes. After that, arm yourself with sponge and scrub it gently. You’ll see that the limescale will dissolve and your shower head should no longer be blocked! Using Viakal regularly will mean that you can keep on top of limescale build-up and prevent it from becoming an issue again.
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Is your showerhead blocked by unsightly calcium deposits? Hard water, particularly from wells, can be high in calcium, magnesium, lime, silica and other minerals. Once hard water passing through a showerhead dries, it leaves behind deposits. This mineral buildup is both unattractive and problematic, as it can plug up the waterways, and prevent your showerhead from flowing at full blast.
Step 1—scrubbing the shower head nozzles with a toothbrush—may not manage to remove all mineral deposits. That’s OK: You can clean off the remainder with household vinegar, whose mild acidity actually dissolves the deposits. To do this, fill a plastic bag with vinegar, then fit the bag over the shower head so that the nozzles are completely submerged. Secure the bag with a zip tie or binder clip, leaving it in place for several hours or overnight. Remember to run the shower for a minute before jumping in to bathe—you don’t want to end up smelling like salad dressing, do you?
So, how do you get rid of all that dirt? Easy peasy. Use Viakal Limescale Remover Spray directly on the shower head and, if it’s a particularly stubborn stain, leave it for up to five minutes. After that, arm yourself with sponge and scrub it gently. You’ll see that the limescale will dissolve and your shower head should no longer be blocked! Using Viakal regularly will mean that you can keep on top of limescale build-up and prevent it from becoming an issue again.
I agree with Lynn’s tip about the spray and walk away foaming-type products. I tried them all and I finally found a winner. My water spots were really severe and a friend told me about Bruce’s heavy duty brown, a paste that you wipe on and rinse off. Now the water just rolls off the glass instead of sticking to it. Ace Hardware has it and it’s only like five bucks.

We have the hardest water I've ever seen so far in my life, and we were hardly getting any shower flow, even though I'd clean the showerhead on the pipe. My husband got a low-flow showerhead at Walmart for around 6 dollars. Even though our water flow is still a little low, I can't believe what we are getting in water flow now. Since the other showerhead is off the pipe, I can really soak it, and check it out, and maybe with a lot of cleaning, it will be useable again! I didn't throw it out.

“Leftover wine” is stale wine. The reason leftover/stale wine can be used as a cleaner (and fresh wine can’t) is because of the air exposure time – when a bottle of wine is opened, the wine is exposed to the air and begins to oxidize (combine with oxygen). As it oxidizes, it will become more acidic and eventually turn into vinegar, often within a couple days. Ways that people use leftover wine (rather than pouring it down the drain since it now tastes stale/like vinegar) are usually as a substitute for vinegar, like for a salad dressing or as a cleaning solution. In other words, you wouldn’t go buy leftover wine; you would buy vinegar. But if you happen to have any leftover wine, this is a way to use it. If you have a neighbor who likes wine, they might have some on hand. Otherwise, you can drink a portion of a new bottle and wait a few days to make your own leftover wine.
I’d like to offer a second option as a solution for a chalky, clogged, old showerhead – replace it! In this video, I show you how to remove your old showerhead and install a new one (or the same one, once it’s been cleaned). Note: if you want to salvage your old showerhead, you’ll have better luck cleaning it when it’s off the shower arm so you can get at it from the inside as well.
I started out with a really clogged shower head. This is the one in our older, not-yet-renovated washroom, but it’s the shower that we all use most often these days. Only about half of the little spray jets were actually working and you would almost always get sprayed right in the face when you were turning the shower on and trying to adjust the temperature. It was probably pretty funny, but it was also really really annoying.
Fill a spray bottle with undiluted lemon juice; add a couple drops of dish soap as a surfactant if you want but don’t overdo it; it’s the lemon juice that does the work. Spray all surfaces repeatedly (letting it soak after each application), until you see some results. When you first start, it will appear to have no more effect than spraying water, but, eventually the stains will start to “run”. Once the lemon juice has loosened the scale, you can use a non-abrasive scrubbing pad with Soft Scrub or Bon Ami to remove it.
I use The Works chemical cleaner. You can get it at any Dollar store. There is no scrubbing and there is no eating holes in anything. My entire shower stall turns brown, so I had tried vinegar and all those little tricks, only to loose the battle. I use the works, then spray a little rain-x on the shower stall. The rain-x helps keep a film over the fiberglass stall so the gunk has nothing to stick to. Hope this helps.
Norma Vally, the former host of Discovery Home Channel’s series “Toolbelt Diva” and a show on Sirius Satellite Radio by the same name. The weekly column is designed to inspire women – weekend warriors, aspiring handywomen, and even seasoned DIYers – to take on home repairs and maintenance projects with confidence and gusto. Fix-It Friday is an exclusive Women You Should Know® editorial series authored by seasoned veteran of home improvement,
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