Gluten-free. Food-garden-obsessed. Terrier-owned. When under pressure, she bakes. Susan Clotfelter edits the Saturday Home section and Grow, The Denver Post's garden section. She reclaimed a formerly weed-infested hell corner with blooming perennials, breaking several garden tools in the process. Favorite smell: Sawdust. Favorite drug: Knitting. Nemesis: Bindweed.
Gluten-free. Food-garden-obsessed. Terrier-owned. When under pressure, she bakes. Susan Clotfelter edits the Saturday Home section and Grow, The Denver Post's garden section. She reclaimed a formerly weed-infested hell corner with blooming perennials, breaking several garden tools in the process. Favorite smell: Sawdust. Favorite drug: Knitting. Nemesis: Bindweed.
Keeping your shower and tub free of soap scum (residue left behind by bar soap), will also allow the minerals that are present in your water to wash down the drain, rather than stick to the soap scum. A portable steam cleaner makes quick work of the soap scum removal, and can be purchased for minimum investment. Using a daily shower spray, is another cheap and easy way to keep soap scum at bay. You might also consider waxing the surfaces in your shower, after you've removed all the soap scum. This will prevent new soap scum from forming.
Keeping your shower and tub free of soap scum (residue left behind by bar soap), will also allow the minerals that are present in your water to wash down the drain, rather than stick to the soap scum. A portable steam cleaner makes quick work of the soap scum removal, and can be purchased for minimum investment. Using a daily shower spray, is another cheap and easy way to keep soap scum at bay. You might also consider waxing the surfaces in your shower, after you've removed all the soap scum. This will prevent new soap scum from forming.
I keep a spray bottle of half vinegar, half water, and a spritz of dish detergent for everyday use. Once a week, I spray the showerhead with this vinegar mixture and it keeps the holes unclogged. When I started, about a third of the holes were stopped up and this mixture cleared them up and keeps them open. I haven't had a problem since I started doing this.
Taking a shower is something many Americans do every single day. Sometimes multiple showers in a day! But, cleaning your shower doesn’t happen every day, and when it does, it likely avoids cleaning the shower head! With all the spray holes, tiny spaces between, and hard-water build-up and grossness, we avoid it, and just deal with whatever water pressure it puts out.
A quick internet search on how to descale any household object will nearly always lead to white vinegar. Even sensitive items like sterilisers for baby bottles are in safe hands. When using vinegar to descale a shower head, the first thing to get right is the type of vinegar. Malt vinegar isn’t particularly effective and brown vinegar may stain, so white distilled vinegar is best.
I keep a spray bottle of half vinegar, half water, and a spritz of dish detergent for everyday use. Once a week, I spray the showerhead with this vinegar mixture and it keeps the holes unclogged. When I started, about a third of the holes were stopped up and this mixture cleared them up and keeps them open. I haven't had a problem since I started doing this.
If you find your shower head looking dingy, you're losing spray power, or there's random jets shooting all over, it's probably time to clean your shower head. Even if you don't have hard water, many people experience a build up of mineral deposits on their shower head after a while. Aside from making your shower head look dirty, these deposits can often times block the jet openings on the shower head preventing it from producing the desired spray. A good soak and scrub can eliminate this in just a few minutes. But, before reaching for a harsh, toxic chemical to clean your shower head, consider using a more eco-friendly cleaning method.
Here is what you can do, make a paste of baking soda with warm water. Wear a pair of gloves to protect your hands as baking soda is abrasive by nature and apply this mixture on the shower head. Our advice would be not letting it sit longer and then cleaning it with a soft cotton cloth. Remember to rinse it thoroughly with water and then see the magic!
Step 1—scrubbing the shower head nozzles with a toothbrush—may not manage to remove all mineral deposits. That’s OK: You can clean off the remainder with household vinegar, whose mild acidity actually dissolves the deposits. To do this, fill a plastic bag with vinegar, then fit the bag over the shower head so that the nozzles are completely submerged. Secure the bag with a zip tie or binder clip, leaving it in place for several hours or overnight. Remember to run the shower for a minute before jumping in to bathe—you don’t want to end up smelling like salad dressing, do you?

First slip a rubber band over the top of the showerhead. You may want to loop it around the shower arm once or twice so the plastic bag will stay in place. Then fill a plastic bag with white vinegar. Attach the bag to the showerhead by slipping the top of it underneath the rubber band. Wait one hour, then remove the bag and turn on the water to flush. Polish with a soft cloth.
If you are having stubborn stain issues, you can soak the shower head even longer to see if it will blast away.  If you wish, you can use some baking soda and rub that in to the small nozzles with a cleaning toothbrush which will help break down any additional limescale and remove the discolouration.  Rinse it clean and you should notice a difference.  Keep in mind that brown discolouration is ugly (I believe this has to do with iron content in water), but is not harming the functionality of the shower head. Green and white ‘crust’ is what you really need to work on, calcium and limescale are the culprits in clogging your shower head.
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