Start by opening a window or door to ventilate the room, then grab your favorite tub-and-tile spray cleaner, like CLR Fresh Scent Bath and Kitchen Cleaner ($15, amazon.com). "Work on the shower in three vertical sections — this will cut down on fumes and prevent the cleaner from drying before you wipe it," says Forte. Spray the first section, covering both tile and tub, and give it a few minutes to penetrate. Then spray the second section, and let it soak while you clean the first.
Limescale can form either on the outside of your shower head or on the inside, but the chances are that if you have limescale, it is lurking on the interior of the shower head itself. The problem with this is that when the water is trying to get through the pipe and out of the shower head, to give you your daily shower, it can’t find its way through as effectively as if the way was totally clear.
Limescale can form either on the outside of your shower head or on the inside, but the chances are that if you have limescale, it is lurking on the interior of the shower head itself. The problem with this is that when the water is trying to get through the pipe and out of the shower head, to give you your daily shower, it can’t find its way through as effectively as if the way was totally clear.
I use The Works chemical cleaner. You can get it at any Dollar store. There is no scrubbing and there is no eating holes in anything. My entire shower stall turns brown, so I had tried vinegar and all those little tricks, only to loose the battle. I use the works, then spray a little rain-x on the shower stall. The rain-x helps keep a film over the fiberglass stall so the gunk has nothing to stick to. Hope this helps.
Limescale can form either on the outside of your shower head or on the inside, but the chances are that if you have limescale, it is lurking on the interior of the shower head itself. The problem with this is that when the water is trying to get through the pipe and out of the shower head, to give you your daily shower, it can’t find its way through as effectively as if the way was totally clear.
The next step is to soak the showerhead in a cleaning solution to dissolve the clogs. If you were able to remove your showerhead, you can soak it in the smallest container that is large enough to hold it. If the showerhead is still attached, you can use rubber bands or a zip tie to fasten a solution-filled plastic bag around the showerhead to get the job done.
My vinyl tiles in my shower stall walls are coated white. These are only the lower ones. They were like this when I bought the house 5 years ago and nothing has been able to remove this. I have gone to tile stores and bought several different brands of tile cleaners. Tried many bath sprays. Vinegar, CLR, you mention it and it’s been tried. You can’t keep the tiles wet either since they are on the wall. I came home the other day with another tile cleaner from Home Depot. I am afraid to try it after reading the directions. It must be used in a well ventilated area, which the bathroom is not. I don’t want to keel over in the middle of cleaning. Once I get it cleaned off the tile, then I will have to start on the glass block wall next.
Limescale is a chalky white mineral deposit (alkaline) which is a result of hard water. It often occurs on faucets and in tubs and appliances, such as kettles and coffeemakers, and can leave silver and chrome with a gray dullness. White vinegar contains acetic acid and is a great place to start for cleaning these pesky stains. Over time, these mineral build-ups can damage sinks, toilets, and tubs and make soap scum harder to remove.

Water massage settings have been around for years, but there are some other truly new features in today’s showerhead market, such as built-in bluetooth speakers and color-changing LED lights. If turning your shower into a disco isn’t your thing, you might try a thermostatic shut-off valve. This feature will automatically shut off your shower once it warms up to the desired temperature, saving water and taking the guesswork out of getting your shower just right. When you’re ready to get in, just tug the cord to resume water flow.
Norma Vally, the former host of Discovery Home Channel’s series “Toolbelt Diva” and a show on Sirius Satellite Radio by the same name. The weekly column is designed to inspire women – weekend warriors, aspiring handywomen, and even seasoned DIYers – to take on home repairs and maintenance projects with confidence and gusto. Fix-It Friday is an exclusive Women You Should Know® editorial series authored by seasoned veteran of home improvement,
Or you can mix up some citric acid solution, which smells a bit nicer. (I buy it in big bags of crystals which you add to water, but I live with extreme hard water, so use it all the time, may not be worth it for a one off). I've also heard of people using a cheap cola from the supermarket (contains phosphoric acid), either way, pour it on, leave for a couple of hour, rinse off.

OK, for toilet rust, empty the water in the bowl by flushing the toilet with the water to the refill tank off. You can get the remaining water out with a sponge, rag or bilge pump (I happen to have them around the house) then fill the refill the tank with full strength white vinegar and flush (with the water still off). Let soak over night. Brush and flush. If that doesn’t work you can try muriatic acid and do the same routine, except it should only take an hour or less. **WARNING** Muriatic acid is powerful stuff and will eat a hole in…well just about anything not glass or porcelain so be careful! And if you notice anything itching, stop what you are doing and rinse with water.


I use The Works chemical cleaner. You can get it at any Dollar store. There is no scrubbing and there is no eating holes in anything. My entire shower stall turns brown, so I had tried vinegar and all those little tricks, only to loose the battle. I use the works, then spray a little rain-x on the shower stall. The rain-x helps keep a film over the fiberglass stall so the gunk has nothing to stick to. Hope this helps.
×