These days many shower heads are made from flexible rubber. This means, you are saved from removing the shower head as well. Then how do you do it? You can just use your fingers and massage the nozzles to eliminate the clogging. Alternatively, you may use a toothbrush to clean the nozzles too. In basic terms, what this means is that you can solely use fingers or a toothbrush to realize your objective.
Welcome to the Take Charge of Your Home series from Direct Energy! Hiring a professional to perform household maintenance may offer convenience and peace of mind, but you can do many of these jobs yourself with no experience or special tools. And in the process, you’ll save money, learn about how your home works and gain a sense of accomplishment from a DIY task done well!
Or you can mix up some citric acid solution, which smells a bit nicer. (I buy it in big bags of crystals which you add to water, but I live with extreme hard water, so use it all the time, may not be worth it for a one off). I've also heard of people using a cheap cola from the supermarket (contains phosphoric acid), either way, pour it on, leave for a couple of hour, rinse off. 

I use The Works chemical cleaner. You can get it at any Dollar store. There is no scrubbing and there is no eating holes in anything. My entire shower stall turns brown, so I had tried vinegar and all those little tricks, only to loose the battle. I use the works, then spray a little rain-x on the shower stall. The rain-x helps keep a film over the fiberglass stall so the gunk has nothing to stick to. Hope this helps.
Melissa Maker is an entrepreneur, cleaning expert, founder of Toronto’s most popular boutique cleaning service, and star of the Clean My Space channel on YouTube (but she still hates to clean!). Every week, Melissa delivers new videos dishing expert advice on cleaning products, tools, DIY substitutes, and practical, timesaving solutions to everyday problems. Melissa has appeared on the Today Show, and has been featured in InStyle, Real Simple, and Better Homes and Gardens.
My vinyl tiles in my shower stall walls are coated white. These are only the lower ones. They were like this when I bought the house 5 years ago and nothing has been able to remove this. I have gone to tile stores and bought several different brands of tile cleaners. Tried many bath sprays. Vinegar, CLR, you mention it and it’s been tried. You can’t keep the tiles wet either since they are on the wall. I came home the other day with another tile cleaner from Home Depot. I am afraid to try it after reading the directions. It must be used in a well ventilated area, which the bathroom is not. I don’t want to keel over in the middle of cleaning. Once I get it cleaned off the tile, then I will have to start on the glass block wall next.

Or you can mix up some citric acid solution, which smells a bit nicer. (I buy it in big bags of crystals which you add to water, but I live with extreme hard water, so use it all the time, may not be worth it for a one off). I've also heard of people using a cheap cola from the supermarket (contains phosphoric acid), either way, pour it on, leave for a couple of hour, rinse off.
OK, 12 hours has passed…carefully remove the bag and dump the vinegar down the drain. If you want to clean your drain in the process, dump some baking soda down the drain before pouring out the vinegar and your drain will get cleaned as well. Once the vinegar is emptied, run the shower for a minute and let the vinegar rinse off (the smell will go away too). Within minutes your shower will work wonderfully and you’ll be so glad you tried this out!
I believe this is what is on my vinyl tile shower walls. I have tried everything under the sun without any luck. Gal at Home Depot told me to try CLR, but that did not help either. In fact, it looks worse. I have been to many tile stores and bought all their different cleaners. I am about ready to give up. These shower walls were like this when I bought the property 5 years ago and they have not got worse as I make sure to wipe them down after every shower.
But, if you’ve got limescale in other areas of your bathroom, it’s no surprise that the shower head is going to be blocked with limescale, too – after all, it’s where all the water comes out of! Take a look at your shower head and you’ll probably see that it’s covered in limescale; the small holes might even be completely blocked, depending on how hard the water in your area is.
Is your showerhead blocked by unsightly calcium deposits? Hard water, particularly from wells, can be high in calcium, magnesium, lime, silica and other minerals. Once hard water passing through a showerhead dries, it leaves behind deposits. This mineral buildup is both unattractive and problematic, as it can plug up the waterways, and prevent your showerhead from flowing at full blast. 

Use the twist tie or rubber band to fasten the bag to the shower head. Submerge the nozzles in vinegar inside the bag. You will likely observe some "fizzing" as the acetic acid in the vinegar reacts with the calcium on the nozzles. When this stops, you can remove the bag. Check the manufacturer’s cleaning instructions for delicate finishes like brass, nickel, or gold to determine a recommended maximum soaking time.


There are many corrosive products that are out there claiming to blast away calcium, lime and rust (catch my drift?) which I’d never allow in my house.  Certainly, all you need to dissolve this build up is a good soaking in some plain white vinegar.  The acids in vinegar naturally break down limescale and rust and allow your shower heads to work like new again.  You can also use this trick for cleaning and unclogging faucets.
Gluten-free. Food-garden-obsessed. Terrier-owned. When under pressure, she bakes. Susan Clotfelter edits the Saturday Home section and Grow, The Denver Post's garden section. She reclaimed a formerly weed-infested hell corner with blooming perennials, breaking several garden tools in the process. Favorite smell: Sawdust. Favorite drug: Knitting. Nemesis: Bindweed. 

clean shower head of limescale

×