Try buying LemiShine detergent booster at your grocery store next to the dishwasher detergent. Fill part of your dispenser or throw a little in the bottom of your dishwasher every time you run it and after several uses you will begin to notice your glasses start to look like new and it keeps your dishwasher looking good inside too. My husband and I battled this problem for years until a friend told me about LemiShine and I couldn’t believe how well it worked! 

I’m trying this with a faucet that is so blocked up there’s almost no water coming through — and it was new in 2009! I’ve tied a zip bag full of vinegar around the end of the spout and am crossing my fingers. We have terribly hard water that leaves lime/calcium deposits on everything; I have to wipe down the glass in my shower every time it’s used, or I get water spots immediately!
Melissa Maker is an entrepreneur, cleaning expert, founder of Toronto’s most popular boutique cleaning service, and star of the Clean My Space channel on YouTube (but she still hates to clean!). Every week, Melissa delivers new videos dishing expert advice on cleaning products, tools, DIY substitutes, and practical, timesaving solutions to everyday problems. Melissa has appeared on the Today Show, and has been featured in InStyle, Real Simple, and Better Homes and Gardens.

Use the twist tie or rubber band to fasten the bag to the shower head. Submerge the nozzles in vinegar inside the bag. You will likely observe some "fizzing" as the acetic acid in the vinegar reacts with the calcium on the nozzles. When this stops, you can remove the bag. Check the manufacturer’s cleaning instructions for delicate finishes like brass, nickel, or gold to determine a recommended maximum soaking time.


Most people would agree that they would rather not use harsh chemicals close to their skin and so vinegar is a great option for clearing your showerhead of limescale. If your showerhead can be unscrewed from the hose or wall fitting you should do so. Then immerse the showerhead in a bowl full of vinegar. Take it apart as much as possible – some models allow you to unscrew the front section. Leave it overnight and then rinse thoroughly with water until the water runs smoothly through the holes. You may need to use a pin to unblock the holes.
Turn on the water. Open the tap fully to rinse away any remaining loosened debris. Check the water flow for improvement. If the water flow is sufficient, move to the next step. If it is still sluggish, You may need to remove it and give it a good soak in a bucket so that the cleaning solution can do its job from inside the head as well as from outside. See the next paragraph "Cleaning a Detachable Shower Head".

I am so fed up. I have tried EVERYTHING on the windows in Palm Bay, FL where there is horrible well water. The water softener does not make the water right. My brand new dishwasher even has a white film on my dishes. The windows I have washed over eight times using everything, even muriatic acid. It just left more white film. I am so tired of cleaning to no avail. What do PROFESSIONALS use to get the white film and marks off of windows?
I’m trying this with a faucet that is so blocked up there’s almost no water coming through — and it was new in 2009! I’ve tied a zip bag full of vinegar around the end of the spout and am crossing my fingers. We have terribly hard water that leaves lime/calcium deposits on everything; I have to wipe down the glass in my shower every time it’s used, or I get water spots immediately!
I use The Works chemical cleaner. You can get it at any Dollar store. There is no scrubbing and there is no eating holes in anything. My entire shower stall turns brown, so I had tried vinegar and all those little tricks, only to loose the battle. I use the works, then spray a little rain-x on the shower stall. The rain-x helps keep a film over the fiberglass stall so the gunk has nothing to stick to. Hope this helps.

Basically, a shower head (like mine, pictured in this post), is constantly spouting water out, every day at your beck and call.  Naturally, water has calcium and other mineral deposits which over time can (and will) clog faucets, showerheads and coffeemakers (have you seen our blog post on cleaning a Keurig yet?).  This isn’t harmful per se, it just slows the flow.  It constipates, if you will, your system.
Now that the dirty work is behind you, it’s time to consider whether your clogged showerhead nozzles could be a sign of a bigger problem. In most cases, these clogs develop as a result of mineral deposits, such as calcium and manganese, which result in hard water. Showerhead nozzles will slowly develop this buildup even if mineral deposits are present in trace amounts, but they’ll clog much faster if you have hard water.

I’d like to offer a second option as a solution for a chalky, clogged, old showerhead – replace it! In this video, I show you how to remove your old showerhead and install a new one (or the same one, once it’s been cleaned). Note: if you want to salvage your old showerhead, you’ll have better luck cleaning it when it’s off the shower arm so you can get at it from the inside as well.
Although it's very safe to use, you will want to take some precautions when using vinegar as a cleaner. First, be sure to avoid contact with the eyes. If any vinegar gets in your eyes, promptly rinse the entire eye with fresh water, until the sting has completely dissipated. Also, note that while it's safe to use vinegar to clean areas where children play, it's best to do so when they aren't present. Like adults, children shouldn't consume large amounts of vinegar, so be sure to store it out of their reach.

So, how do you get rid of all that dirt? Easy peasy. Use Viakal Limescale Remover Spray directly on the shower head and, if it’s a particularly stubborn stain, leave it for up to five minutes. After that, arm yourself with sponge and scrub it gently. You’ll see that the limescale will dissolve and your shower head should no longer be blocked! Using Viakal regularly will mean that you can keep on top of limescale build-up and prevent it from becoming an issue again.
I have used Goo Gone and a plastic scouring pad. Goo Gone is made to remove sticky substances from wood or glass or metal, but it softens up the hard water spots for removal. I spray the product on the glass, let it sit for about 15 minutes and then use the scouring pad in circular motions. Try it on a small area on the glass. You will feel the difference after one application. Super smooth glass! There have been times when I had to apply more than once, but not often and only is selected spots. Best of luck!
3. Dismantle and clean the showerhead. If there are still mineral deposits, you can scrub the showerhead with an old toothbrush and vinegar to loosen debris. Use a toothpick or safety pin to poke out additional deposits. Then soak the parts in vinegar overnight to dissolve any remaining deposits. For extra cleaning power, scoop a few tablespoons of baking soda in the vinegar for soaking. The natural abrasive will help release clogged passages.  Rinse again.
Basically, a shower head (like mine, pictured in this post), is constantly spouting water out, every day at your beck and call.  Naturally, water has calcium and other mineral deposits which over time can (and will) clog faucets, showerheads and coffeemakers (have you seen our blog post on cleaning a Keurig yet?).  This isn’t harmful per se, it just slows the flow.  It constipates, if you will, your system.
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